10K Calculated Training Plans

Price:

$29.99

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Know Which Level is Right for You

This is a 12-week training plan running coach Ryan Vail that will help you complete your next 10K.

Level 1

This training plan will help you complete your next 10K without any walking. No running experience is needed as this plan will begin with a mixture of walking and jogging as you slowly build up toward being able to complete a full 6.2 miles of running for race day.

Race Goal: Complete all 10K Running
Goal Race Pace: 8:00-12:00/mile
Miles/Week: 8-15
Days/Week: 3-4
Longest Training Run: 5 miles
Experience Level: No running experience required, but decent general fitness recommended.

Level 2

If you’re looking to run your next 10K a little bit faster, then this plan is for you. You’ll start off building up your endurance and then working on some speed workouts to help you get across the finish line faster in your next race.

Race Goal: Run 10K Faster
Goal Race Pace: 7:00-11:00/mile
Miles/Week: 15-25
Days/Week: 4-5
Longest Training Run: 8 miles
Experience Level: Some prior running experience

Level 3

If you really want to get the most out of yourself in your next 10K, then this plan is for you. It will take some hard work, but this plan will provide more high-intensity training to help you run your best while remaining injury-free.

Race Goal: Run 10K your fastest
Goal Race Pace: 6:00-10:00/mile
Miles/Week: 25-35
Days/Week: 5-6
Longest Training Run: 10 miles
Experience Level: Consistent running several weeks prior to starting plan

 

Price:

$29.99

Choose a Level ⬇
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Price:

$29.99

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How it Works

Calculated Training plan, built for your race goal by World Class Coaches

Set Your Goal

After checkout you'll enter your goal race date and goal finishing time.

From this we use our proprietary RunDoyen Hadley Pace Calculator to calculate your training paces.

Online Training Log

You’ll be set up in our complimentary online training log (Final Surge).

This is where your individualized training plan will be placed on your calendar, leading all the way up until race day.

GPS Watch & Mobile App

You can sync your GPS watch training log platform and track your progress..

Download the mobile app to view or log your training while on the go.

Set Your Goal

After checkout you'll enter your goal race date and goal finishing time.

From this we use our proprietary RunDoyen Hadley Pace Calculator to calculate your training paces.

Online Training Log

You’ll be set up in our complimentary online training log (Final Surge).

This is where your individualized training plan will be placed on your calendar, leading all the way up until race day.

GPS Watch & Mobile App

You can sync your GPS watch training log platform and track your progress..

Download the mobile app to view or log your training while on the go.

Training Phase Descriptions

Description: This training plan will help you complete your next 10K without any walking. No running experience is needed as this plan will begin with a mixture of walking and jogging as you slowly build up toward being able to complete a full 6.2 miles of running for race day.

Phase 1 (4 weeks):

The first four weeks will focus on building a solid foundation and slowly increasing volume. You will be given the option of walking, run/walk combination, or running for each training day during this phase. The total weekly volume will be 8 miles with 3-4 days of running per week. The longest training day will top out at 3 miles.

Phase 2 (2 weeks):

During our second phase, we will continue slowly building volume, but we will put the emphasis on running for the majority of the miles with 1-2 days of optional run/walk. Training will continue at 3-4 days per week with a weekly total of 10-12 miles. We will also slowly increase the long run to 4 miles.

Phase 3 (4 weeks):

This will be the meat of the twelve-week training plan. The goal for the next 4 weeks is to spend almost all the miles running with one optional run/walk day. We will also incorporate some effort-based workouts such as Fartleks and light strides. Fartlek are simply effort and time-based workouts to get used to running faster than the standard easy pace running/ walking days. The weekly mileage will be 12-15 miles, and the long run will jump to 5 miles to ensure that you are fully ready to make the leap to the 10K distance on race day.

Phase 4 (2 weeks):

During the final two weeks we will taper the mileage, focus on recovery, and make sure you are ready to toe the line feeling fit and rested. Training will return to 3 days per week, and the long run will drop back to 4 miles as you approach race day.

Description: If you’re looking to run your next 10K a little bit faster, then this plan is for you. You’ll start off building up your endurance and then working on some speed workouts to help you get across the finish line faster in your next race.

Phase 1 (3 weeks):

The first four weeks will focus on building a solid foundation before moving toward more specific 10K workouts. This means slowly increasing volume while also being introduced to effort-based workouts, such as hills and Fartleks, with no specific paces attached. The total weekly volume will be 15-20 miles with 4-5 days of running per week. The longest run during this phase will top out at 5-6 miles.

Phase 2 (3 weeks):

Our second phase will start incorporating specific pacing but will still mostly focus on strength-based workouts that are a bit slower than your 10K race target. This includes tempo runs, progression runs, and more fartlek efforts. Training will continue at 4-5 days per week with a weekly total of 20-25 miles. We will also slowly increase the long run to 6-7 miles to get close to, or slightly over the race distance.

Phase 3 (4 weeks):

This will be the meat of the twelve-week training plan. We will spend the third phase dialing in 10K pace and slowly increasing workout intensity. The workouts will include interval training, tempo runs, and some light speed work. The weekly mileage will be 25 miles in 4-5 training days, and the long run will jump to 8 miles to ensure that you are fully ready for a warmup, race, and cooldown on the same day.

Phase 4 (2 weeks):

During the final two weeks we will taper the mileage, focus on recovery, and make sure you are ready to toe the line feeling fit and rested. Training will return to 3-4 days per week, and the long run will also drop to 5 miles leading up to the race.

Description: If you really want to get the most out of yourself in your next 10K, then this plan is for you. It will take some hard work, but this plan will provide more high-intensity training to help you run your best while remaining injury-free.

Phase 1 (3 weeks):

The first four weeks will focus on building a solid foundation before moving toward more specific 10K workouts. This means slowly increasing volume while also being introduced to effort-based workouts with no specific paces attached, including Fartleks and hills. The total weekly volume will be 25 miles with 4-5 days of running per week. The longest run during this phase will top out at 7-8 miles.

Phase 2 (3 weeks):

Our second phase will start incorporating specific pacing but will still mostly focus on strength-based workouts that are a bit slower than your 10K race target. This includes tempo runs, progression runs, and more fartlek efforts. Training will move to 5-6 days per week with a weekly total of 30 miles. We will also slowly increase the long run to 8-9 miles to get well over the race distance.

Phase 3 (4 weeks):

This will be the meat of the twelve-week training plan. We will spend the third phase dialing in 10K pace and slowly increasing workout intensity. The workouts will include interval training, tempo runs, as well as speed work. The long-run will jump to 10 miles to ensure that you are fully ready for a warmup, race, and cooldown on the same day. The volume will peak at 35 miles and the training load will be 5-6 days per week.

Phase 4 (2 weeks):

During the final two weeks we will taper the mileage, focus on recovery, and make sure you are ready to toe the line feeling fit and rested. Training will return to 4-5 days per week, and the long run will also drop to 7-8 miles to make sure you are ready for race day.